Monthly Archives: September 2015

F*cking Do It: Actor/Writer Bodine Boling

BodineBolingHow about that? F*cking do it. Asterisk for the sake of not triggering any filters or blockers or whatever the kids call the buzz-killing censorship algorithms these days.

I digress. This week’s Coffee with Creatives episode is with the multi-talented Bodine Boling, whose film Movement + Location is currently in release in Los Angeles (after a week-long theatrical run in NYC) and available on several VOD channels.

We had a great talk about the travails of writing and producing a low-budget independent film. Subtopics included:

  • MAL_onset1How varying production experiences can help improve your work in other areas
  • How/why she wrote the script for Movement + Location seventeen times before shooting it
  • The importance of having a reward you can envision at the end of a long-term pursuit
  • How to deal with a shoot location burning down
  • Working with your spouse
  • The sometimes harsh and insane financial reality of making art

Check it out. If you dig what Bodine has to say, take a look at Movement + Location. If you liked this episode, please share it on Twitter or Facebook!

This episode is also on iTunes.

Dirty Roots: Coffee with Creatives Q&A Episode

I have tried to A your Qs...

As detailed in my previous post, this week’s episode of Coffee with Creatives is an experiment. It’s been busy lately, with The Confession and The Videoblogs both taking up a lot of my time. It wasn’t possible to prep an interview episode for this week. Still, it’s important to me to keep providing useful content on creative productivity.

So, here we are, instead. The idea for this Q&A-style episode came to me last weekend, when I received some questions about making short films on Twitter. After answering on YouTube at that time, I decided to try a Q&A episode of the podcast as well. I crowdsourced some additional questions over the week, and recorded my answers yesterday.

Both the audio from the YouTube video and my new recorded answers are included in the episode. Here are the questions that I tried to answer:

  • What’s the right length for a short film script? What genre should it be?
  • Does the creative mind ever stop and rest?
  • When writing a story, what would be your advice on how to show a trait or theme, as opposed to explaining the same to the audience?
  • How do you know when you’re being hypercritical or when you’re just not into a story anymore?
  • How do you get past the self-criticism phase of writing?
  • What is your process for creating a new story?

Please let me know if this sort of stuff is at all helpful, if I could do anything different, or if you have any follow-up questions.

Thanks for listening. If you’re enjoying the show, please consider making a small ongoing contribution to help me keep it going.

602066_10100681300095942_1773576913_n (2)Like my style? Subscribe to my list for advanced/exclusive (and free!) access to new (creative) content produced by yours truly. I send one email per month.

Coffee with Creatives: Send Questions!

Screen Shot 2015-06-08 at 9.57.33 AMI’m running an experimental episode of Coffee with Creatives this week, which will take the form of an informal Q&A on topics related to creative productivity. There’s a frequent and understandable overlap between this overarching topic (which acts as the backbone of the show) and filmmaking and writing (my vocations) — so I’ll answer some questions about these subjects as well.

We’ll see how the episode goes. If it does well enough, and/or there seems to be a demand for an occasional Q&A segment, I’ll build it into future plans.

So, please send any questions I might be able to answer. If you have any questions you aren’t sure I can answer, ask anyway. I’ll try to source them out for you, whether by reaching out to previous guests, tapping my network, or going hunting.

Feel free to leave your questions here, in the comments, or on Facebook or Twitter. I’ve copied samples of what has come in so far below.

Please send your questions by 10PM on Thursday, 9/17.

Questions for Next Episode of Coffee with Creatives

  • What’s the right length for a short film script? What genre should it be?
  • Does the creative mind ever stop and rest?
  • When writing a story, what would be your advice on how to show a trait or theme, as opposed to explaining the same to the audience?
  • How do you know when you’re being hypercritical or when you’re just not into a story anymore?
  • How do you get past the self-criticism phase of writing?

602066_10100681300095942_1773576913_n (2)Like my style? Subscribe to my list for advanced/exclusive (and free!) access to new (creative) content produced by yours truly. I send one email per month.

The Confession Gets the Green Light!

confWell, then!

Shortly after I published this post last night — about why we’re trying to break some rules with The Confession — an Anonymous contributor vaulted us past the 80% funded threshold required to get a green light on Seed&Spark.

That means The Confession is definitely happening!

Thank you, sincerely, to all of our supporters — and that includes everyone who has shared, favorited, and liked social media posts. We’re excited to get the film shot and out to you before the end of the year.

We have a few days left to get to 100% funded. To join the rest of use rule-breakers, click here.

Here are two of the more popular examples of our #FalseAssertion meme, which comes as an incentive for contributing $25…

12009596_10102036879683582_8112634870380758091_n

11988531_10102036403013832_3256117313201247794_n

Breaking Rules: Fast, Cheap, and Good

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 7.45.00 PMFast, cheap and good. You can only pick two.

The above represents a stated wisdom across a number of business sectors.

Perhaps you’ve heard a version of the statement before. For any of who haven’t, the idea is that, when considering the creation of a product, the delivery of a service, or the management of a project — that quality can only be achieved if either quite a bit of time is taken (in situations of low budgeting) or an appropriate amount of money is spent (in situations of timely delivery) in producing whatever is being produced.

We won’t even discuss fast and cheap and not-good as an option.

Why do I bring this all up? Because I believe — even in regards to filmmaking, which is a costlier artistic pursuit (in theory) than, say, narrative fiction writing — that this adage is out of date.

I believe one can produce a quality product quickly and cheaply — with some qualifications.

  • Limits must be strategically set to assure quality can be achieved.
  • Experience must be leveraged, as an asset, to help offset lowered costs
  • Cheap must be redefined at scale

To bring a practical example into the discussion, know that I bring all this up specifically in regards to my campaign to get THE CONFESSION funded, shot, and delivered to its audience — quickly.

The Limits

IMG_1639 (1)The Confession, once finished, will be shorter than Multiverse (about 7 min). That’s one limit. Also, it was specifically written (as was The Videoblogs) so that it could be shot on the go in New York City. When we shoot it, we will be cruising the streets — in daylight — which means we don’t need additional lighting. There are only two main characters in the piece.

Something I have learned about limits, after so many years of indie filmmaking — is that you empower yourself by setting as many of them ahead of time as possible. By narrowing our focus with The Confession, we’ll allow the actors to dive deep into the story material for those few minutes when they’ll be on screen.

The Experience

As I mentioned, it took me some time (and some error) to get better at proactively setting limits. Still, by now, that experience boosts the quality of most projects I put together as a more seasoned filmmaker. Beyond this, however, the cast and crew we’ve brought on board for The Confession will be bringing years of their own experience to “set” when we shoot. That’s a given on many films, however — we’ve stacked the deck with The Confession. In the name of quality and speed.

It can be hard for talented artists to band together and create something, these days. Production funds are often in short supply. Many of us have spent years pitching in personal funds, and sacrificing job opportunities, for the chance and time to string together a catalogue of good work. We squeeze tightly to what little time we have to eke out The Next Thing.Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 3.23.12 PM

Crowdfunding helps enormously to allow each next thing thing to come, usually by combination of continual hard work and sacrifice (on our part), and the ability to pay certain hard costs, by the good-faith generosity and support of the audience.

But I believe there’s a middle ground. I believe — with the right respect for limits and on an appropriate scale — that a group of talented collaborators can come together for a day to make something fun and special, and then get that well-done, finished thing to supporters within a reasonable timeframe. It just takes a refreshed definition of cheap.

Cheap Doesn’t Have to Mean “Low Value”

When you infuse a product with the blood of experience, and spend time smartly defining some limits, so that specific areas can be adequately explored, a great amount of value is brought to its genesis that cannot be defined in hard dollars.

In today’s increasingly tech-enabled, and hyper-connected environment — it’s relatively easy to produce good work speedily. The trick is the labor.

We all deserve fair wages. I believe that. I also believe in respecting the truth behind any self-given creative endeavor.

No one’s making us go ahead with The Confession. Under all practical definitions, I probably should be resting, or focusing more completely on The Videoblogs, or Coffee with Creatives, or the new script I’m writing.

But you know what? I want to make it. I really, really do. I think the project is fun. I’m excited to have less responsibility, as Jaclyn Gramigna produces and directs. I’m looking forward to speeding through something, with no strings attached other than the making and delivery of the thing. I need to offset the hard work and the seriousness of The Videoblogs and the podcast with a dose of the non-serious but no-less universal.

So what do we do? What have we done? Well, as many of you know — we’ve gone to our audience for help.

This is not new, either for me or in general. Crowdfunding, as I mentioned, is most decidedly a thing. But even as our experience with The Videoblogs illustrates, crowdfunding in such a direct way — 1) You pay us to bring our knowledge and experience to work towards the creation of the product (film), and  2) We go immediately into delivering it — that doesn’t usually happen. Most of what we’re looking to raise goes directly to scheduling cast and crew for the day, to help us more easily and more quickly bring you a quality, funny little film.

Fast. Cheap. Good. You can only pick two.

I disagree.

I want to break that rule and try something different. It feels like the right move. Several people have joined in by now, but we don’t have a lot of time left to fund The Confession.

I’d love for you to join us.

602066_10100681300095942_1773576913_n (2)Like my style? Subscribe to my list for advanced/exclusive (and free!) access to new (creative) content produced by yours truly. I send one email per month.

Lost in Stories: Writer/Actor Vanessa Shealy

Screen Shot 2015-09-03 at 4.46.02 PM

Today’s Coffee with Creatives interview is with hyphenate Vanessa Shealy, a Writer and Actor (and Producer) fresh off a successful (but still ongoing!) Kickstarter for her co-created indie comic, Couri Vine.

We had a great conversation about:

  • Falling into acting as a release11828619_10153272990012284_7680790401937617824_n
  • Getting lost in stories (in a good way)
  • Dreams as composite maps of experience
  • The usefulness of having something to prove
  • Preparing to enter a new medium
  • Imbuing superpowers with character, just as often as you go about doing the opposite

If you enjoy what Vanessa has to say, and want to grab yourself a copy of Couri Vine, head over to the Kickstarter page for the project. You can also find Vanessa on Twitter.

This episode is also on iTunes.

602066_10100681300095942_1773576913_n (2)Like my style? Subscribe to my list for advanced/exclusive (and free!) access to new (creative) content produced by yours truly. I send one email per month.

TODAY ONLY: Threat of Glass Pre-Release Offer!

1907691_10101126203915122_258988990_o

Thanks to everyone who has already contributed to the Seed&Spark campaign for THE CONFESSION. To help keep things moving, I’ve authorized myself to release this special offer.

For the remainder of today, anyone who contributes $1 or more to our campaign will be put on a list to receive an advanced (free) copy of my next short story: THREAT OF GLASS.

THREAT OF GLASS
A literary young man privately deconstructs a street performer’s decision to hold audience attention by threatening a jump into a pile of broken glass.

The story is about 4,000 words. It’s more fun than it sounds! If enough people take me up on the offer, I promise to turn the next draft around within the next week or so. Then, I’ll send it to contributors via email. No one else will get the story until much later.

Here’s how to redeem:

  1. Contribute $1 or more to THE CONFESSION.
  2. When finished, alert me on Twitter or Facebook.
  3. I will contact you for your email address. Or, you can send a note to me here.

Thanks for your time, and I hope to threaten you with glass very soon!

Michael